einstein (São Paulo). 19/Aug/2019;17(4):eAO4725.

Drug interactions among older adults followed up in a comprehensive medication management service at Primary Care

Tayane Oliveira dos Santos ORCID logo , Mariana Martins Gonzaga do Nascimento ORCID logo , Yone Almeida Nascimento ORCID logo , Grazielli Cristina Batista de Oliveira ORCID logo , Ursula Carolina de Morais Martins ORCID logo , Danielle Fernandes da Silva ORCID logo , Djenane Ramalho de Oliveira ORCID logo

DOI: 10.31744/einstein_journal/2019AO4725

ABSTRACT

Objective:

To estimate the prevalence of drug interactions and associated factors among older adults followed up in a Comprehensive Medication Management Service at Primary Care.

Methods:

Firstly, the Beers criteria 2015 was used to define drug interactions; later, drug interactions proposed by Dumbreck for patients with diabetes, depression, and heart failure were evaluated. The associated factors were assessed by univariate (Pearson’s χ2) and multivariate analyses (logistic regression). The significance level of 5% was set for all analyses.

Results:

The mean age of the studied population was 70.2±7.8 years; 52.2% were between 60 and 69 years, and 61.3% were female. Among the older adults, 94.5% used two or more drugs (condition for the occurrence of drug-drug interaction). The prevalence of drug interaction according to the Beers criteria was 4.9%. After multivariate analysis, diseases of the central nervous system, arrhythmia, number of medications, and female sex were positively associated with drug interaction. The prevalence of drug interaction according to Dumbreck was 27.2%. After multivariate analysis, the number of medications, the presence of heart failure, and Charlson comorbidity index greater than 1 were conditions positively associated with drug interactions.

Conclusion:

The holistic and individualized approach used in comprehensive medication management services for older patients is important, considering the prevalence of drug interactions and the need to minimize adverse events.

Drug interactions among older adults followed up in a comprehensive medication management service at Primary Care

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