einstein (São Paulo). 01/Sep/2016;14(3):330-7.

Disparities in cancer epidemiology and care delivery among Brazilian indigenous populations

Pedro Nazareth Aguiar Jr., Gustavo Trautman Stock, Gilberto de Lima Lopes Jr., Michelle Samora de Almeida, Hakaru Tadokoro, Bárbara de Souza Gutierres, Douglas Antônio Rodrigues

DOI: 10.1590/S1679-45082016AO3754

ABSTRACT
Objective:
To assess aspects related to cancer in indigenous population.
Methods:
This is a retrospective study developed in a public university hospital. We included patients with 18 or more years of age, diagnosed with solid tumors, and followed between 2005 and 2015. Clinical features were assessed by descriptive statistics, and survival was evaluated by Kaplan-Meier curves and multivariate Cox regression.
Results:
Fifty patients were included. The cancer incidence was 15.73 per 100,000. The mean age at diagnosis was 54 years and most patients were female (58%). Cancer of the cervix (28%) and prostate (16%) were the most common. The mean time between the onset of symptoms and the diagnosis was 9 months and from diagnosis to the treatment was 3.4 months. Disease diagnosed at stage IV (17%) had worse overall survival (HR: 11.4; p<0.05). The 5-year survival rate ranged from 88% for prostate cancer to 0% for lung cancer. All 5-year survival rates were lower as compared to other populations.
Conclusion:
The most prevalent cancer sites were cervix and prostate. Disease stage and primary site were prognostic factors.

Disparities in cancer epidemiology and care delivery among Brazilian indigenous populations

Comments