einstein (São Paulo). 22/May/2019;17(3):eAO4399.

Lipid profile and statin use in critical care setting: implications for kidney outcome

Isabelle Malbouisson ORCID logo , Beata Marie Quinto ORCID logo , Marcelino de Souza Durão Junior ORCID logo , Júlio Cesar Martins Monte ORCID logo , Oscar Fernando Pavão dos Santos ORCID logo , Roberto Camargo Narciso ORCID logo , Maria Aparecida Dalboni ORCID logo , Marcelo Costa Batista ORCID logo

DOI: 10.31744/einstein_journal/2019AO4399

ABSTRACT

Objective:

To determine whether pre-hospital statin use is associated with lower renal replacement therapy requirement and/or death during intensive care unit stay.

Methods:

Prospective cohort analysis. We analyzed 670 patients consecutively admitted to the intensive care unit of an academic tertiary-care hospital. Patients with ages ranging from 18 to 80 years admitted to the intensive care unit within the last 48 hours were included in the study.

Results:

Mean age was 66±16.1 years old, mean body mass index 26.6±4/9kg/m2 and mean abdominal circumference was of 97±22cm. The statin group comprised 18.2% of patients and had lower renal replacement therapy requirement and/or mortality (OR: 0.41; 95%CI: 0.18-0.93; p=0.03). The statin group also had lower risk of developing sepsis during intensive care unit stay (OR: 0.42; 95%CI: 0.22-0.77; p=0.006) and had a reduction in hospital length-of-stay (14.7±17.5 days versus 22.3±48 days; p=0.006). Statin therapy was associated with a protective role in critical care setting independently of confounding variables, such as gender, age, C-reactive protein, need of mechanical ventilation, use of pressor agents and presence of diabetes and/or coronary disease.

Conclusion:

Statin therapy prior to hospital admission was associated with lower mortality, lower renal replacement therapy requirement and sepsis rates.

Lipid profile and statin use in critical care setting: implications for kidney outcome

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