einstein (São Paulo). 01/Jun/2013;11(2):237-46.

Current data on IL-17 and Th17 cells and implications for graft versus host disease

Marília Normanton, Luciana Cavalheiro Marti

DOI: 10.1590/S1679-45082013000200019

Human interleukin 17 was first described in 1995 as a new cytokine produced primarily by activated T CD4+ cells that stimulate the secretion of IL-6 and IL-8 by human fibroblasts, besides increasing the expression of ICAM-1. Various authors have reported that IL-17A has a role in the protection of organisms against extracellular bacteria and fungi due to the capacity of IL-17A to recruit neutrophils to the areas of infection, evidencing a pathological role in various models of autoimmune diseases, such as experimental autoimmune encephalitis and arthritis. The participation of IL-17A has also been described in the acute rejection of organ transplants and graft versus host disease. However, the greatest revolution in research with IL-17 happened in 2000, when it was proposed that IL-17 cannot be classified as Th1 or Th2, but rather, simply as a new lineage of IL-17-producing T-cells. These findings modified the previously established Th1/Th2 paradigm, leading to the definition of the CD3+ CD4+ Th17 cellular subtype and establishment of a new model to explain the origin of various immune events, as well as its implication in the graft versus host disease that is discussed in depth in this article.

Current data on IL-17 and Th17 cells and implications for graft versus host disease

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